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Kawagoe “Little Edo” Photo Stroll

Travelling in Japan can be quite time-consuming, not to mention costly. If you don’t have the time or the monetary funds to hop from Tokyo to Kyoto, then you’d appreciate Kawagoe1x1.trans Kawagoe Little Edo Photo Stroll

1x1.trans Kawagoe Little Edo Photo Stroll

Kawagoe is only 30 minutes by train from central Tokyo and has been given the nickname, “Little Edo.” You’ll understand this nickname upon seeing the streets of Kawagoe. It is lined with many Kurazukiri, warehouse-style, clay houses that were the popular type of architecture during the Edo Period, thus, Kawagoe’s nickname.

1x1.trans Kawagoe Little Edo Photo Stroll 1x1.trans Kawagoe Little Edo Photo Stroll

In the past, Kawagoe was also a capital of trade, supplying many goods to Tokyo. Shogun in Tokyo named their loyal men as the lords of Kawagoe castle. And because of the close ties between Kawagoe and Tokyo (which was named “Edo” back then), the area of Kawagoe inherited a lot of the style and architecture from the capital.

1x1.trans Kawagoe Little Edo Photo Stroll

So if you like the Kyoto feel and historical vibe of Japan, take a stroll around Little Edo. The area is picturesque and truly breathtaking for fans of history.  1x1.trans Kawagoe Little Edo Photo Stroll

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Memoirs of Kyoto Photo Stroll Part 2

If you enjoyed our quick photo stroll around Kyoto in Part 1, then here is a continuation of our virtual Kyoto Tour!  1x1.trans Memoirs of Kyoto Photo Stroll Part 2

1x1.trans Memoirs of Kyoto Photo Stroll Part 2

1x1.trans Memoirs of Kyoto Photo Stroll Part 2

Similar to the Golden Pavillion, the Ginkakuji or the Silver Pavillion, was also a former retirement villa for a shogun. Now, it is a zen temple that is also a location of the UNESCO World Heritage site.

1x1.trans Memoirs of Kyoto Photo Stroll Part 2

However, despite being named the Silver Pavillion, the nickname did not come from its exterior being covered in silver (which it is not) unlike the Golden Pavillion. Many say that it was simply a nickname given as a contrast to the Golden Pavillion, while others say that its former coat of black lacquer paint gave the building a silvery-shine when hit by moonlight.

1x1.trans Memoirs of Kyoto Photo Stroll Part 2

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1x1.trans Memoirs of Kyoto Photo Stroll Part 2



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